Second time the charm

Photo: supplied
Photo: supplied

PETER RABBIT 2
Director: Will Gluck
Stars: James Corden, Domhnall Gleeson, Rose Byrne, Elizabeth Debicki, Margot Robbie, Aimee Horne, Lennie James, Rupert Degan, David Oyelowo, Colin Moody, Damon Herriman, Ewen Leslie
Rating: (G) ★★★★

REVIEWED BY CHRISTINE POWLEY

I was less than enamoured by Peter Rabbit when it came out in 2018: it seemed like a crass insult to the memory of Beatrix Potter and the generations who had loved her stories.

Peter Rabbit 2 (Rialto) is more of the same, but this one manages to be funnier because the post-modern ironic gags are given to the humans instead of just the rabbits.

Maybe the second time was a charm for me because I had already been desensitised. Whatever the reason I laughed as wholeheartedly as any 7-year-old as Peter Rabbit (James Corden) showed off his skill for cartoon violence.

The film starts with Tom (Domhnall Gleeson) and Bea (Rose Byrne) getting married. Bea has self-published her illustrated story about the rabbits and it is doing well.

She is then approached by a celebrity publisher Nigel Basil-Jones (David Oyelowo), who wants her to take things to the next level and soon she is drawing the rabbits on jeans and T-shirts, looking for more urban grit and higher sales.

Peter, meanwhile, is feeling unappreciated and falls into some bad company in the shape of an older streetwise bunny called Bannabas (Lennie James), who claims to have known Peter’s dad.

Bannabas appreciates Peter's talent for larceny and soon they have everyone involved in a heist at the farmers market.

None of this has much to do with Beatrix Potter, or Easter, but it certainly will go down a treat this long weekend.

 

 

 

 

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