Scrap-metal bike that is fit for a King

North Otago artist Matt King's "Tansley Snawton'' is another found-metal sculpture - and working...
North Otago artist Matt King's "Tansley Snawton'' is another found-metal sculpture - and working bicycle - made from plough parts from the late Herbert identity Stanley Watson's scrap metal collection. PHOTO: HAMISH MACLEAN
Modelled after an old Victorian velocipede, the top speed of Matt King's latest creation is an unknown.

"How big is the hill?'' the North Otago artist asked.

The roughly 50kg, working found scrap-metal bicycle sculpture has no brakes, but with the Victorian Heritage Celebrations theme this year of "wheels'', Mr King entered the "bone shaker'' - made almost exclusively from old plough parts - in the celebrations' grand street parade through Oamaru at the weekend.

Now with plans to open a gallery at his Herbert workshop, the velocipede would remain in his collection and would go on display.

Mr King named the two-wheeler the "Tansley Snawton'', a tip of the hat to Mr King's late friend, Herbert identity Stanley Watson, who donated the scrap metal used.

"He had a great eye for treasures,'' Mr King said.

"I inherited a whole yard full of agricultural implements, and this old plough was one of them. And I just thought, 'It's got to be a velocipede.'''

In 2017, for the Waitaki Arts Festival, Mr King rode a "moa bike'' through Oamaru made from a Honda XL 105 frame, with a neck made from horseshoes and rebar and a head fashioned from a rotary hoe.

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