Folk festival organiser always looking for ways to improve

Enjoying a jam session on their banjos at the Whare Flat Folk Festival yesterday were (from left) Monica Barkman, Robbie Stevens and Carola Dunbar, all of Dunedin. Photos: Gerard O'Brien
Enjoying a jam session on their banjos at the Whare Flat Folk Festival yesterday were (from left) Monica Barkman, Robbie Stevens and Carola Dunbar, all of Dunedin. Photos: Gerard O'Brien
As the 45th Whare Flat Folk Festival drew to a close, its organiser praised it as a world-class event.

Downpours on Wednesday night and steady drizzle yesterday did not deter revellers from enjoying the final full day of the annual festival, held at Waiora Scout Camp.

They took shelter in a large marquee as they enjoyed a range of performances throughout the day, from artists such as The Broken Heartbreakers and Adam Hattaway and The Haunters.

Dunedin singer Lana Rose entertains the crowd.
Dunedin singer Lana Rose entertains the crowd.
Festival organiser Bill Morris was over the moon with how the festival had gone.

‘‘It’s been amazing, we’re still reeling,’’ he said.

The quality of the performers the festival now attracted was particularly high, he said.

‘‘I’m feeling so proud and pleased at how it’s gone.’’

The festival usually attracted just over 1000 people during its run.

Attendees rang in the new year with the traditional New Year’s Eve ceilidh, or a barn dance, which remained popular, he said.

While basking in the glow from this year’s success, he was turning his attention to the next event.

‘‘We believe this is an international-standard folk festival, so you’re always looking for ways to make it better.

‘‘All of the work we’ve put in over the last decade to build this festival up is starting to pay off.’’

daisy.hudson@odt.co.nz

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