Remembering Anzac Day from their bubbles

NZ Fire and Emergency crew members gathered outside Dunedin's Central Station to pay tribute this...
NZ Fire and Emergency crew members gathered outside Dunedin's Central Station to pay tribute this morning. PHOTO: CHRISTINE O'CONNOR

People stood on their driveways and fire crews gathered outside the station as dawn broke over Dunedin this Anzac Day.

A Stand at Dawn Anzac Day service, organised by the Returned and Services' Association and the New Zealand Defence Industry Association, was broadcast on Radio NZ at 6am, including the Last Post and Ode of Remembrance.

Across Dunedin, people found ways to show their support from their bubbles, as the Covid-19 pandemic prevented large gatherings this year.

About 15 New Zealand Fire and Emergency crew members stood outside the Central Station with fire engines behind them.

Senior Sergeant Officer of Red Watch Dunedin, Mark Leonard, said the members had come from the city's Central, St Kilda and Willowbank stations to commemorate.

He said what many did not know, was that those who established Dunedin’s Central Station the late 1800’s had army involvement, and many of their current members had been a part of the army, including the British Army.

The bagpipe player who played Last Post at their service this morning had also been in the army.

A group fromTe Rangi Hiroa College turned out this morning. PHOTO: CHRISTINE O'CONNOR
A group fromTe Rangi Hiroa College turned out this morning. PHOTO: CHRISTINE O'CONNOR
Residents of Te Rangi Hiroa College watched from the other side of Castle St.

College head Rosemary Tarbotton said they had planned to stand outside their college at dawn,  but when they saw the crew outside the fire station they decided to wander down the street, remaining in their bubble.

From left: Cayla Hosking, Zachary Nunn , Craig Pollock, Wendy Ross, Kiegan Booth, outside their...
From left: Cayla Hosking, Zachary Nunn , Craig Pollock, Wendy Ross, Kiegan Booth, outside their home at Quarry Rd in Kinmont, Mosgiel on Anzac morning. PHOTO: CHRISTINE O'CONNOR
Wendy Ross, of Mosgiel, and her family also joined the Stand at Dawn service from their home.

She had decorated her fence with old records which she had melted, painted and shaped into poppies.

Anzac Day had been a day to celebrate her grandparents who were in World War 2, with one of them being a prisoner of war, she said.

“The family usually get together to reminisce about their lives.

“In 2014 I went to Anzac Cove and that gave me a deeper appreciation of what our soldiers went through for us, and what some of them are still doing.”

John Cosgrove stands with his wife Kathleen in front of their house to commemorate Anzac Day....
John Cosgrove stands with his wife Kathleen in front of their house to commemorate Anzac Day. Photo: JOHN COSGROVE
John Cosgrove, who served with the Royal NZ Army and now works as a reporter for Allied Press, said the saw several other people standing by their gates from his house in Helensburgh playing the broadcast app on their phones.

At 6am what sounded like three shots rang out, matching the bells tolling on the radio.

molly.houseman@odt.co.nz 

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